About

About Troop 31


Thinking About Joining Troop 31?

Troop 31 is 80+ years old and has a long successful history. We have many active Scouts of all ages, ranks, and abilities in our Troop, led by adults who enjoy participating in Scouts. All of the Troop's adult leaders are volunteers and new adult leaders are welcome.

If your son is crossing over from Cub Scouts, there is a $1 transfer fee. Each Scout should have at least one Class-A Boy Scout shirt with proper insignia/patches. Proper attire (Class-A shirt, belt, neckerchief/slide) is to be worn to meetings during the school year, while the Scouts can wear a Class-B Troop 31 t-shirt during the summer. In addition, Scouts need to purchase a Troop 31 neckerchief and a Boy Scout handbook. Our Troop also charges a one-time equipment fee per family. This fee is used to purchase/upgrade Troop supplies on an ongoing basis, to ensure that your son is using proper working equipment when on Troop campouts or events.

Our Troop is sponsored by the Oswego Presbyterian Church on Route 25 in Oswego and meets on Monday evenings from 7pm - 8:30pm. The Troop meets year-round except on those Mondays when there is no school, unless noted. Scouts are encouraged to attend summer camp, which usually takes place the second week of July, and there is usually a campout the first weekend of August. After that campout, the Troop takes a break from meetings until after Labor Day.

Active Scouts earn merit badges and rank advancements as they progress through the Troop. The Troop holds a Court of Awards once or twice a year where parents and friends are invited to watch as Scouts receive their advancements.

Troop 31 holds Troop and Scout fundraisers during the year. The Troop fundraiser, raising money for Troop needs, is held during Oswego's PrairieFest, over Father's Day weekend, selling hotdogs, chips, water and pop. We rely on Scouts and their parents to volunteer a few hours this weekend and we ask for a donation of two (2) cases of pop per Scout. Scouts can earn money for their Scout Account by participating in the BSA popcorn sale held in the fall or by participating in the Troop Spaghetti dinner, usually held in March. Scout Accounts can be used to pay for monthly camping fees, summer camp fees, to purchase needed camping supplies or for other approved Troop expenses including yearly dues.

Our Troop usually participates in a monthly campout. Permission slips and information are handed out as soon as available. Drivers are always needed for these events, and parents are welcome to attend. The Troop usually leaves for campouts on Friday evening at 5pm from Oswego Presbyterian Church and returns Sunday at 11am to Traughber Junior High School.

We hope you and your son come visit Troop 31. Do not hesitate to ask questions should you have any.

Scoutmaster
scoutmaster@oswegotroop31.org

Troop Organization

The Troop has many positions of responsibility for both Scouts and Leaders. To learn more and see a detailed organizational breakdown, see below.

Troop Organization

The Scoutmaster

The Scoutmaster is appointed by the Troop Committee and is responsible for the image and program of the Troop. The Scoutmaster and his Assistant Scoutmasters work directly with the Scouts. The importance of the Scoutmaster's job is reflected in the fact that the quality of his guidance will affect every youth and adult involved in the Troop.

The Scoutmaster can be male or female, but must be at least 21 years old.

The Scoutmaster's duties include:

General

- Train and guide youth leaders.
- Work with other responsible adults to bring Scouting to boys.
- Recruit the Committee Chairperson, and together recruit all other Committee positions.
- Use the methods of Scouting to achieve the aims of Scouting.
- Scouts run the Troop; the Scoutmaster is the only adult who can change Troop plans or rules.
- Help boys learn for themselves.
- Help the Committee Chairperson plan Committee meetings.

Meetings

- Meet regularly with the Patrol Leaders' Council for training and coordination in planning Troop activities.
- Attend all Troop meetings or, when necessary, arrange for a qualified adult substitute.
- Attend Troop Committee meetings.
- Conduct periodic parents' sessions to share the program and encourage parent participation and cooperation.
- Take part in annual membership inventory and uniform inspection, charter review meeting, and charter presentation.

Guidance

- Conduct Scoutmaster Conferences for all rank advancements.
- Encourage all Scouts to achieve First Class rank their first year and one rank every year after.
- Provide a systematic recruiting plan for new members and see that they are promptly registered.
- Delegate responsibility to other adults and groups (Assistants, Troop Committee) so that they have a real part in Troop operations.
- Supervise Troop elections for the Order of the Arrow.
- Approve all service projects.

Activities

- Make it possible for each Scout to experience at least 10 days and nights of camping each year.
- Participate in council and district events.
- Build a strong program by using proven methods presented in Scouting literature.
- Conduct all activities under qualified leadership, safe conditions, and the policies and procedures of the Troop, the chartered organization and the Boy Scouts of America.

Assistant Scoutmasters

Assistant Scoutmasters help guide the program of the Troop. Each Assistant Scoutmaster is assigned specific program duties and reports to the Scoutmaster. They also provide the required two-deep leadership standards set by the Boy Scouts of America (there must be at least two adults present at any Boy Scout activity). An Assistant Scoutmaster may be 18 years old, but at least one in each Troop should be 21 or older, so he or she can serve in the Scoutmaster's absence. Most successful Troops have four or more trained Assistant Scoutmasters.

Types of Assistant Scoutmasters may include:

Assistant Scoutmaster - Senior Assistant

- Serves as Acting Scoutmaster when the Scoutmaster is absent.
- Attends Troop meetings, Committee meetings and Patrol Leader Council meetings.
- Helps conduct Scoutmaster Conferences.
- Helps the Scoutmaster organize, delegate and coordinate other adult leaders.
- Reports to the Scoutmaster.

Assistant Scoutmaster - Program

- Attends Troop meetings and Patrol Leader Council meetings.
- Attends roundtables monthly to get new program ideas.
- Follows up with the SPL to make sure all PLC decisions are delegated and completed.
- After each Troop event, evaluates with the PLC how everything went, and how it could be improved.
- Reports to the Scoutmaster.

Assistant Scoutmaster - New Scouts

- Recruits new members.
- Maintains a good working relationship with Cub Scout and Webelos feeder Packs/Dens.
- Participates in District/Council youth recruiting efforts.
- Attends Cub Scout Blue and Gold dinners.
- Attends Webelos bridging ceremonies.
- Helps Troop Guide plan the Webelos campout.
- Advises Troop Guide and Den Chiefs.
- Reports to the Scoutmaster.

Assistant Scoutmaster - Patrol Advisor

- Serves as advisor for all patrols. Supports Patrol Leaders with suggestions and counseling.
- Follows up to assure that the Patrol Leader is making phone calls, etc.
- Attends training courses and roundtables.
- Reports to the Scoutmaster.

Assistant Scoutmaster - Advancement

- Stimulates advancement and recognition in accord with National requirements.
- Plans and organizes Courts of Awards.
- Encourages Life Scouts to attain Eagle.
- Advises and counsels Life Scouts with the planning of Eagle Scout Service Projects.
- Reports to the Scoutmaster.

Patrols

The Scout Troop is made up of Patrols. A Patrol is a grouping of approximately six to eight boys who work together. Each Patrol elects its own boy leader, called a Patrol Leader.

The New Scout Patrol is composed of new members who have not entered the seventh grade. The Experienced Scout Patrol is for those boys who are age 12 and older.

The Patrol Leaders' Council

The Patrol Leaders' Council, not the adult leaders, is responsible for planning and conducting the Troop's activities. The Patrol Leaders' Council is composed of the Troop's youth leaders including the Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Patrol Leaders, Assistant Patrol Leaders, Troop Guides, Historian, Instructors, Librarian, Chaplain Aide, Junior Assistant Scoutmasters, Den Chiefs, Quartermaster, Scribe, Photographer and Bugler.

The Troop's activities are selected and planned at an annual program planning conference. The Troop's yearly plan is then submitted to the Troop Committee for approval. The Troop Committee either approves the plan or makes alternative suggestions for the Patrol Leaders' Council to consider. At its monthly meetings, the Patrol Leaders' Council organizes and assigns responsibilities for the weekly Troop meetings. The Troop Committee interacts with the Patrol Leaders' Council through the Scoutmaster.

The Troop's Youth Leaders

The Troop is actually run by its boy leaders. With the guidance of the Scoutmaster and his Assistants, they plan the program, conduct Troop meetings, and provide leadership among their peers.

Junior Leader Positions

Senior Patrol Leader - Reports to the Scoutmaster

- Presides at all Troop meetings, events, activities, and annual program planning conference.
- Chairs the Patrol Leaders' Council.
- Appoints other junior leaders with the advice and consent of the Scoutmaster.
- Assigns duties and responsibilities to other junior leaders.
- Works with the Scoutmaster in training junior leaders.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader - Reports to the Senior Patrol Leader and 1st Assistant Scoutmaster

- Acts as Assistant for the Senior Patrol Leader.
- Is responsible for training and giving direct leadership to the following appointed junior leaders: Troop Scribe, Librarian, Historian, Photographer, Instructors, Quartermaster, and Chaplain's Aide.
- Takes over Troop leadership in the absence of the Senior Patrol Leader.
- Performs tasks assigned by the Senior Patrol Leader.
- Functions as a member of the Patrol Leaders' Council.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Troop Historian - Reports to the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

- Collects and maintains pictures and facts about past activities of the Troop and keeps them in scrapbooks, wall displays, on the Troop website, or information files.
- Takes care of Troop trophies and keepsakes.
- Keeps information about Troop alumni.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Librarian - Reports to the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

- Establishes and maintains Troop library, keeping Troop books, pamphlets, magazines, audiovisuals, and merit badge counselor list available for use by Troop members.
- Keeps records on literature owned by the Troop.
- Adds new or replacement items as needed.
- Has literature available for borrowing at Troop meetings.
- Maintains system to check literature in and out.
- Follows up on late returns.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Instructor - Reports to the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

- Teaches one or more advancement skills to Troop members.
- Instructs Scouting skills as needed within the Troop or Patrols.
- Prepares well in advance for each teaching assignment.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Chaplain Aide - Reports to the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

- Assists in Troop religious services.
- Keeps Troop leaders appraised of religious holidays when planning activities.
- Assists Chaplain or religious coordinator in meeting the religious needs of Troop members while in activities.
- Encourages saying grace at meals while camping or on activities.
- Promotes the Religious Emblem Program to Scouts.
- Presides over closing prayer at Troop meetings.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster - Reports to the Scoutmaster or 1st Assistant Scoutmaster

- Is a Scout 16 years of age or older who supervises and supports other boy leaders as assigned.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Patrol leader - Reports to Senior Patrol Leader

- Plans and leads Patrol meetings and activities.
- Keeps Patrol members informed.
- Assigns each Patrol member a job and helps them succeed.
- Represents the Patrol at all Patrol Leaders' Council meetings and at the annual program planning conference.
- Prepares the Patrol to take part in all Troop activities.
- Develops Patrol spirit.
- Works with other Troop leaders to make the Troop run well.
- Knows what Patrol members and other leaders can do.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Assistant Patrol Leader - Reports to the Patrol Leader

- Assists the Patrol Leader in
- planning and leading Patrol meetings and activities.
- keeping Patrol members informed.
- preparing your Patrol to take part in all Troop activities.
- Takes weekly attendance of Patrol attendance and provides to Scribe.
- Takes charge of the Patrol in the absence of the Patrol Leader.
- Represents the Patrol at all Patrol Leaders' Council meetings in the absence of the Patrol Leader.
- Helps develop Patrol spirit.
- Works with other Troop leaders to make the Troop run well.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Troop Guide - Reports to the Assistant Scoutmaster, New Scout Patrol

- Helps Scouts meet advancement requirements through First Class.
- Advises New Scout Patrol Leader on his duties and his responsibilities at Patrol Leaders' Council meetings.
- Attends Patrol Leaders' Council meetings with the New Scout Patrol Leader.
- Prevents harassment of new Scouts by older Scouts.
- Helps Assistant Scoutmaster train new Patrol Leader when he is elected.
- Guides new Scouts through early Troop experiences to help them become comfortable in the Troop and the outdoors.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Den Chief - Reports to the Pack Den Leader and the Assistant Scoutmaster, Den Chiefs

- Works with a Cub Scout Den as a guide, serving as the activities assistant at Den meetings.
- Meets regularly with the Den Leader to review Den and Pack meeting plans.
- If serving as a Webelos Den Chief, prepares the boys to join Boy Scouting.
- Projects a positive image of Boy Scouting.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Quartermaster - Reports to the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

- Attends Patrol Leader Council meetings.
- Responsible for Troop supplies and equipment.
- Keeps records of Troop equipment
- Keeps Troop equipment in good repair.
- Issues Troop equipment and sees that it is returned in good order.
- Suggests new or replacement items.
- Works with the Assistant Scoutmaster responsible for equipment.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Scribe - Reports to the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

- Is the Troop Secretary.
- Attends and keep a log of Patrol Leaders' Council meetings
- Places records on Troop website.
- Records attendance (with help from Assistant Patrol Leaders)
- Assists Troop Committee members responsible for finance, records, and advancement.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Bugler - Reports to the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

- Sounds Taps, Assembly and Revelry at Troop campouts
- Sounds Assembly at weekly meetings.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

Photographer - Reports to the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

- Takes pictures at Troop meetings and activities.
- Digitizes images to be placed online.
- Works with Troop Historian to place photographs online.
- Sets a good example.
- Wears the uniform correctly.
- Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

The Troop Committee

The responsibilities of the Committee Chairman:

- Organize the Committee; assure all functions are delegated, coordinated and completed.
- Call, preside at, and promote attendance at monthly and special Troop Committee meetings.
- Arrange for charter review/re-chartering annually; maintain a close relationship with the Chartered Organization.
- Be familiar with local and national BSA policies.
- Work closely with the Scoutmaster to prepare the Committee meeting agenda.
- Ensure Troop representation at roundtables; attend training courses.
- Secure local and national tour permits for the Troop, as needed.
- Be responsible for the Troop insurance program.

Job responsibilities of the Committee Treasurer:

- Handle all Troop funds; pay bills as necessary.
- Be responsible for the Friends of Scouting campaign within the Troop.
- Maintain Troop checking and savings accounts and Scout Accounts.
- Keep adequate records of Troop incoming/outgoing finances.
- Report the Troop financial standings at each Committee meeting.
- Attend Committee meetings regularly and report to the Committee Chairman as needed.

Job responsibilities of the Committee Secretary:

- Keep minutes at Committee meetings.
- Assist with Troop orientation for new Committee Members.
- Type up newsletters as needed.
- Type up permission slips.
- Attend Committee meetings regularly and report to the Committee Chairman as needed.

Job responsibilities of the Activities Chairman:

- Secure local/national tour permits.
- Work with the Scoutmaster and Quartermaster to inventory, store and maintain equipment.
- Assist in securing permission to use campsites.
- Assist in procuring new/used equipment.
- Serve as transportation coordinator.
- Keep records of adult leader vehicle information.
- Attend Committee meetings regularly and report to the Committee Chairman as needed.

Job responsibilities of the Fundraising Chairman:

- Be responsible for securing fundraising opportunities.
- Assist with planning and organizing fundraisers.
- Attend Committee meetings regularly and report to the Committee Chairman as needed.

Job responsibilities of a Committee Member:

- Vote on issues before the Committee.
- Assist other Committee members, as needed.
- Assist on special projects/activities, as needed.
- Attend Committee meetings regularly and report to the Committee Chairman as needed.